TAG: larry bird

The announcement arrived today. NYC native and one of the illest, most unique talents to ever rise from the city asphalt, Chris Mullin, has been elected to the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. In lieu of the great news, I’m rewinding this selection from a couple of years back, as we celebrate Mo’s achievement.

Christopher Paul Mullin was a simple, neighborhood guy from Troy Avenue in the Flatlands section of Brooklyn. The love affair with hoops was a multi-generational thing that began in the driveway of the family’s small row house. Read More »

photo: corbisimages.com

Tonight, The Celtics and Knicks will play their first meaningful game in quite some time. Back in the day, when the incomparable Larry Bird and Bernard King were battling, the divisional rivalry was tangible.

In addition to Boston and New York being two of the three remaining original 11 NBA franchises (the Warriors are the other), the teams have had 12 postseason battles, with each walking away with six series victories. Read More »

As we transition into one of the most highly anticipated seasons in recent memory, my mind has been shifting into overdrive, thinking about some of the more memorable moments in my hoops-loving life. For those of us who are similarly afflicted, I need not explain to ecstatic rush of emotion and joy that overwhelms us as we witness these brilliant episodes of b-ball transcendence.

Caught up in the moment, you realize that not only are you watching a once-in-a-lifetime display, but you value the fact that these experiences will escort you through life, in the same way that birthdays, first kisses, senior proms, graduations and anniversary’s do. Read More »

As we transition into one of the most highly anticipated seasons in recent memory, my mind has been shifting into overdrive, thinking about some of the more memorable moments in my hoops-loving life. For those of us who are similarly afflicted, I need not explain to ecstatic rush of emotion and joy that overwhelms us as we witness these brilliant episodes of b-ball transcendence.

Caught up in the moment, you realize that not only are you watching a once-in-a-lifetime display, but you value the fact these experiences will escort you through life, in the same way that birthdays, first kisses, senior proms, graduations and anniversary’s do. It’s like the first time you heard Sucker MC’s, Eric B is President, Dougie and Slick Rick’s The Show or Pete Rock and CL Smooth’s They Reminisce , in that you knew that your life was irrevocably altered from that moment on.

Catch me in the midst of one of these magical events, like Jordan’s 63, Bernard King’s Christmas gift, Mo Cheeks running a team, Phi Slamma Jamma, a young Penny Hardaway on the come-up, the Fab Five or Lebron’s 48-Special and, if you didn’t know me, you’d swear that I’d just escaped from Bellevue, in serious need of meds and some padded walls.

In today’s installment of Machine Gun Funk, we take it back to the spring of 1988, when Dominique Wilkins and Larry Bird put on a show that will forever stand the test of time. Read More »

And now, the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Thanks to the historic rampage that the Lakers went on last night in their 89-67 victory, the basketball universe will be treated to a delicious winner-take-all Game 7 tomorrow evening. The last time we saw Kobe Bryant in Boston’s TD Banknorth Garden, he was fighting by himself, seemingly buck naked, like the Asian dude in the movie, The Hangover, when he hops out of the trunk and causes some bodily harm before escaping into the desert to bring back re-inforcements.

After Game 5, it was apparent that if the Lakers had any chance of successfully defending their title, Kobe would need his entire supporting cast to step up and be counted. And in Game 6, that’s just what happened. And then some! Read More »

The Dish: Mo Cheeks The Latest / Feb 23, 2010 / 1:08 pm

The Dish aka The Assist. It’s my favorite part of the game because it’s the most philanthropic. While most casual observers appreciate the dudes that can get buckets, my informal education as a New York City playground point guard stipulated that I acknowledge, comprehend and cherish the brilliance of the pass that led to the basket, as well as players with an innate ability to make others better.

And few players running the point will ever, in my eyes, match the understated brilliance of Maurice Edward Cheeks. Read More »

photo: sheepy712.files.wordpress.com

The scam went down like this. A skinny kid named Reggie would be tossing up jumpers at the John Adams Elementary School and other playgrounds in Riverside, California. His older sister, Cheryl, would be at the other end of the court, tossing up bricks. Sometimes, she would wind up and heave the ball over the backboard and into the chain link fence.

Reggie would approach a couple of kids and the convo normally went down like this -

“You guys want to play two-on-two? I’m waiting for my man to show up. Or I can just play you with my sister down there.” Read More »

Bounce Magazine

photo: celticsbeagle.net

A few weeks ago, we celebrated the one year anniversary of “The Playground Gave Us…”

It’s been an incredible journey – connecting the past with the present and opening a floodgate of discussion, debate & appreciation for the exploits of those who touched our spirits through our beautiful game.

A year ago this week, we examined the late, great Reggie Lewis. In celebration of the belated birthday of “The Playground Gave Us…” series, I give you the updated version on the re-mix tip.

The fall of the Boston Celtics empire was not due to, though it did coincide, with Larry Bird’s back problems in the late ’80s and early ’90s. The definitive blows were delivered in the forms of the untimely passing of the franchise’s future torchbearers – Len Bias in ‘85 and Reggie Lewis in ‘93.

Reggie Lewis, known as “Truck” to his family and friends in his hometown of Baltimore, was on the cusp of stardom when he succumbed to a heart condition. At the moment of his death, he was doing what he loved – playing ball. Read More »